Audio

MIXTAPE: FUTURES & PASTS, weekly from FreeformPortland, 90.3fm, via Mixcloud

Futures & Pasts is a weekly radio show from Portland, Oregon which provides an enlightening mix of late’70’s DIY punk, femme punk, postponk & current music exploring the same kinda noisemaking. It’s hosted by Erika Elizabeth who has an impressively deep knowledge of her subject matter.  She also contributes articles to the music zine Maximum RockandRoll.

The show broadcasts live every Thursday night from 8-10pm PST at 90.3FM in N/NE Portland, or worldwide at freeformportland.org. Complete shows are available on Mixcloud.

futuresandpasts

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PAULO COELHO, in conversation with Krista Tippett, unedited interview, On Being, Aug 4, 2016

A fascinating and inspiring conversation between novelist Paulo Coelho and On Being host Krista Tippett.  This clip contains the whole unedited interview.  From August 4, 2016.

“Paulo Coelho is the author of many books including “The Pilgrimage,” “Veronika Decides to Die” and “The Alchemist.” His forthcoming book out in the fall is “The Spy.” This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode “Paulo Coelho — The Alchemy of Pilgrimage.”

PLAYLIST: INDIEGROUND’S AWESOME MIXTAPE, All of 2016 edition

From the folks at Indiegroundradio in Athens – a Best of 2016 mixtape.  playing tracks by(Γεωργία Νήρου) E, (Nick’s Flicks) Animal Collective, (High Fin Delity) Declan McKenna, (Wanted Man) The Dead Rabbits, (Antony K.) Swans and more.

Part one of two,  2 hours and 20 min long.  Via Mixcloud.

 

Playlist: FUTURE SOUL, by walkerdad, via Soundcloud, 178 min.

I had the pleasure of spending three hours listening to walkerdad’s most recent playlist/mixtape release, Future Soul.   walkerdad is Robin Hall, a fervent music maker, listener & chronicler from nyc, whose previous mixtapes I’ve also enjoyed.  Incidentally, he also was a member of the  nyc no-wave outfit  Jack Ruby back in the day, whose tracks have seen a resurgence of interest, an album re-release and appearances in the recent HBO series, Vinyl.

Future Soul is tailor-made for the thinking romantic soul-music lover; the mix takes us on a journey through passages of varying textures, tempos and styles, and includes many classic soul and early r&b tracks that somehow stand out in a brand new way.  walkerdad avoids many soul music’s less memorable cliches, and while it’s packed with soul’s passion, it steers away from the overly lush, sentimental or bawdy corners of the loose genre. If the title is to be read as a gentle manifesto is unclear, but as a listening experience, Future Soul posited a sonic world of love, sorrow, lust and ebullience that I was very happy to inhabit for its 2 hours and 58 minutes of running time.

Highly recommended.

Also, check out walkerdad’s other mixtapes on his Mixcloud channel:

https://beta.mixcloud.com/kingwinter/

LAURIE ANDERSON / JOHN GIORNO / WILLIAM S BURROUGHS :: YOU’RE THE GUY I WANT TO SHARE MY MONEY WITH (full album), 1981

You’re the Guy I Want To Share My Money With is a double album released in 1981. The album is a collaboration by Laurie Anderson, John Giorno and William S. Burroughs, recorded during their “Red Night” spoken word tour of 1981.[1] Released through Giorno Poetry Systems Institute, the album was funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. Most of Anderson’s material came from her performance piece, United States, and live versions of some tracks, such as “It Was Up in the Mountains”, would also be included in her later 5-LP release, United States Live. This was Anderson’s first substantial album release (previously she had only contributed a track or two), and she followed this in 1982 with her first full solo album, Big Science. Continue reading LAURIE ANDERSON / JOHN GIORNO / WILLIAM S BURROUGHS :: YOU’RE THE GUY I WANT TO SHARE MY MONEY WITH (full album), 1981

Playlist:LOST IN TRANSMISSION No.22, by Folk Radio UK via Mixcloud

An excellent mixtape from the folks at Folk Radio UK, and hey it’s even slightly festive.

Here are their notes regarding their set:

“Whilst not a full-on festive offering, our latest mix does contain some festive cheer courtesy of a reading from Robert Frost as well as music from Steve Tilston & Maggie BoyleTim LaycockRichard Farina With Blind Boy Grunt (better known as Bob Dylan) & Eric Von Schmidt, and some top-notch wassailing from John Kirkpatrick.

Scattered amongst this festive sprinkling are some classics from the likes of John MartynSandy DennyHamish Imlach and Richard Thompson as well as unique offerings from Maarja Nuut and new music from DakhaBrakha and Siobhan Miller‘s new single. There’s also some old recordings from Topic Records back catalogue including Ed Pickford with Ee Aye, Aa Cud Hew, Gordeanna McCulloch with The Clutha and Exiles who were Enoch Kent, Bobby Campbell and Gordon McCulloch.”

 

JEAN PROUVE’S DEMOUNTABLE HOUSES, 1944

Architect/Designer Jean Prouvé began to design portable and demountable barracks for the French army during the Second World War. After the war, the French government commissioned Prouvé to design inexpensive, effective housing for the newly homeless, prompting him to perfect his patented axial portal frame to build easily constructed demountable houses. Few of these groundbreaking structures were built, making them exceedingly rare today.

Jean Prouvé (8 April 1901 – 23 March 1984) was a French metal worker, self-taught architect and designer. He is also designated as “constructor”. His main achievement was transferring manufacturing technology from industry to architecture, without losing aesthetic qualities. His design skills were not limited to one discipline. During his career Jean Prouvé was involved in architectural design, industrial design, structural design and furniture design.Though lacking any formal education in architecture, he became one of the most influential architects of the 20th century, boldly experimenting with new building designs, materials and methods. “His postwar work has left its mark everywhere,” wrote Le Courbusier, “decisively.”

Working from the postulate that there was no structural difference between a piece of furniture and a building, Jean Prouvé developed a “constructional philosophy” whose artifice-free aesthetic of functionality and fabrication applied the same principles to furnishings and architecture. First produced in small series in the 1930s, his structures were assembled and integrated with the aid of shrewdly designed systems for modification, dismantling and moving of both furniture and buildings.

The genesis of these demountable houses came about in the early 1930s, when Jean Prouvé – up to that point an art-deco-trained metal worker who produced furniture – began to experiment with architectural structures. Entirely self-taught, to Prouvé there was “no difference between the structure of a building and the structure of a table,” as his grandson Serge Drouin explained to Dwell in 2014. By the end of the 1930s, Prouvé had refined his structural system and patented the “axial portal frame”, the two-legged structure that served as the main structural support in all of his subsequent demountable designs.

The Second World War – more specifically the end of the war and the accompanying need to quickly provide shelter to a shell-shocked French populace – provided an opportunity for Prouvé’s demountable houses to finally be put to use. According to the NGO Committee on Human Settlements, the French ministry for Reconstruction and Urban Development placed an order for 800 units, but only half of these were produced after the government soon switched to a strategy of permanent rebuilding rather than temporary housing. This sudden halt in production in France, combined with the French Government’s policies of “cultural exception” enacted after the war, left French Modernists (with the exception of Le Corbusier) “marginalized inside something of a cultural bubble” according to Claudia Barbieri, and Prouvé’s demountable designs languished in architectural obscurity for decades.