Category Archives: Logos

WISCONSIN DEATH TRIP, docu-drama by James Marsh, 1999, based upon the famous 1973 book by Michael Lesy

Wisconsin Death Trip is a 1999 American black-and-white and color docudrama film written and directed by James Marsh, based on the 1973 book of the same name by Michael Lesy. Original music for the film was composed by DJ Shadow, with original piano music for the closing credits by John Cale.

The film dramatizes the photographs by Charles Van Schaick found by in the early 1970s by Lesy, connected to a series of macabre incidents that took place in Black River Falls, Wisconsin in the late 19th century, and, in part, the film was shot on location there. Marsh makes use of silent black-and-white recreations with voice-over narration by Ian Holm contrasted with contemporary color footage of the area.

Wisconsin Death Trip is a 1973 non-fiction book by Michael Lesy, based on a collection of late 19th century photographs by Jackson County, Wisconsin photographer Charles Van Schaick – mostly taken in the city of Black River Falls – and local news reports from the same period. It emphasizes the harsh aspects of Midwestern rural life under the pressures of crime, disease, mental illness, and urbanization.

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Continue reading WISCONSIN DEATH TRIP, docu-drama by James Marsh, 1999, based upon the famous 1973 book by Michael Lesy

JOHN GIORNO :: NO GOOD DEED GOES UNPUNISHED, 2007

JOHN GIORNO:  NO GOOD DEED GOES UNPUNISHED

2007

If you’re going to make my life miserable, or bring me bad news, hang up now, but if you’re going to bring joy into my life, and bring me great news, you, I want to talk to, start talking. I want to walk down runways into bathrooms I never been before, I want to walk down catwalks into toilets I never been before, I want to walk down catwalks into toilets I never been before, get what you want, ecstasy and viagra, we do anything and everything you want, too much is not enough, And sometimes, drugs and alcohol numb the nerves numb the nerves, allowing the natural clarity of the mind to flow free, like an auto accident you can’t keep your eyes off it like an auto accident you can’t keep your eyes off it, no good deed goes unpunished I want to rub my face in it and I want to roll in it I want to rub my face in it and I want to roll in it I want to rub my face in it and I want to roll in it, and eat the smell, and the sheer joy of swimming, absolute bliss in bottomless sewers, absolute sewers and bottomless bliss, completely pure, completely pure completely pure completely pure completely pure, primordially pure and empty, eating the sky eating the sky eating the sky eating the sky eating the sky, millions of stars come into my heart, welcome home. Hammering nails into steel with a fist full of water, hammering nails into steel with a fist full of water, hammering nails into steel with a fist full of water; and grabbing a handful of snow from the fire. Many years ago, I thought I could fly, and maybe, I got off once.

 

John Giorno (1936)

Produced by NoeltanFilm

LAURIE ANDERSON / JOHN GIORNO / WILLIAM S BURROUGHS :: YOU’RE THE GUY I WANT TO SHARE MY MONEY WITH (full album), 1981

You’re the Guy I Want To Share My Money With is a double album released in 1981. The album is a collaboration by Laurie Anderson, John Giorno and William S. Burroughs, recorded during their “Red Night” spoken word tour of 1981.[1] Released through Giorno Poetry Systems Institute, the album was funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. Most of Anderson’s material came from her performance piece, United States, and live versions of some tracks, such as “It Was Up in the Mountains”, would also be included in her later 5-LP release, United States Live. This was Anderson’s first substantial album release (previously she had only contributed a track or two), and she followed this in 1982 with her first full solo album, Big Science. Continue reading LAURIE ANDERSON / JOHN GIORNO / WILLIAM S BURROUGHS :: YOU’RE THE GUY I WANT TO SHARE MY MONEY WITH (full album), 1981

MARGARET ATWOOD, in conversation with Patty Satalia for WPSU

Award-winning Writer and Environmental Activist Margaret Atwood discusses her career.with Patty Satalia.  Produced by WPSU, Public Media For Central Pennsylvania.

Margaret Atwood was born in 1939 in Ottawa, and grew up in northern Ontario, Quebec, and Toronto. She is the author of more than forty volumes of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction, but is best known for her novels. Atwood’s work has been published in more than forty languages. She was honored with the 2014 Medal for Distinguished Achievement from Penn State’s Institute for the Arts and Humanities.

ROBERT FROST :: THE ROAD NOT TAKEN

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
-Robert Frost

the International Poetry Incarnation, Royal Albert Hall, June 11, 1965

‘…the Underground was suddenly there on the surface’
Jeff Nuttall, author

‘All these people recognised each other and they all realised they were part of the same scene.’
Barry Miles, author

“The poets were not given any running order and the evening ran with seemingly little structure. Adrian Mitchell read his popular poem, a rant against the Vietnam War – To Whom it May Concern to huge enthusiasm. Allen Ginsberg read New York Bird by Russian poet Andrei Vosnesensky; the poet was present but forbidden to perform by the Russian authorities. To round off the evening Ginsberg read two 2 of his long poems – The Change and Who Be Kind To.

The audience were handed flowers as they entered the arena which, full of a heavy-drinking crowd, quickly became filled with a marijuana smoke, flying paper darts and foliage.”-Royal Albert Hall website Continue reading the International Poetry Incarnation, Royal Albert Hall, June 11, 1965

JAMES BALDWIN: THE PRICE OF THE TICKET (trailer from the 1990 documentary)

An excerpt/trailer from the documentary, James Baldwin: The Price Of The Ticket Producer/Director: Karen Thorsen, Producers: William Miles and Douglas K. Dempsey

‘James Baldwin (1924-1987) was at once a major twentieth century American author, a Civil Rights activist and, for two crucial decades, a prophetic voice calling Americans, Black and white, to confront their shared racial tragedy. James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket captures on film the passionate intellect and courageous writing of a man who was born black, impoverished, gay and gifted.

James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket uses striking archival footage to evoke the atmosphere of Baldwin’s formative years – the Harlem of the 30s, his father’s fundamentalist church and the émigré demimonde of postwar Paris. Newsreel clips from the ’60’s record Baldwin’s running commentary on the drama of the Civil Rights movement. The film also explores his quiet retreats in Paris, the South of France, Istanbul and Switzerland – places where Baldwin was able to write away from the racial tensions of America.

Writers Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, William Styron and biographer David Leeming place Baldwin’s work in the African-American literary tradition – from slave narratives and black preaching to their own contemporary work. The film skillfully links excerpts from Baldwin’s major books – Go Tell it on the Mountain, Notes of a Native Son, Another Country, The Fire Next Time, Blues for Mister Charlie, If Beale Street Could Talk – to different stages in Black-white dialogue and conflict.

Towards the end of his life, as America turned its back on the challenge of racial justice, Baldwin became frustrated but rarely bitter. He kept writing and reaching in the strengthened belief that : “All men are brothers – That’s the bottom line.”

Produced in association with American Masters and Maysles Films’   -notes on the film from the California Newsreel website, http://newsreel.org/video/JAMES-BALDWIN-THE-PRICE-OF-THE-TICKET

JACK KEROUAC reads October In The Railroad Earth

Jack Kerouac reads his piece October In The Railroad Earth from the 1959 album Poetry for the Beat Generation, accompanied by Steve Allen on the piano.

October In The Railroad Earth is a memoir recounting Kerouac’s memories of his experiences as a “student brakeman” on the Southern Pacific Railroad in California. Its structure is episodic: its fifteen sections are loosely linked together by being set in the month of “October” and by focusing on his early career on the railroad. The piece was originally titled The Railroad Earth, first published in 1957. Continue reading JACK KEROUAC reads October In The Railroad Earth