Tag Archives: abstract art

THE PAINTING TECHNIQUES OF FRANZ KLINE, AB EX NY, via MoMA 4 min

Aother great, short piece from the Ab Ex series, this one about Franz Kline’s materials a process. 4 min.  From the MoMA archives.

Filmed by Plowshares Media
Images courtesy of The Franz Kline Estate; Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko; Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; and The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Music by Chris Parrello
Chris Parrello, Ian Young, Kevin Thomas, Ziv Ravitz
© 2010 The Museum of Modern Art

MICHAELA EICHWALD

Born: Cologne, Germany, 1967

Lives and works: Berlin, Germany

“Michaela Eichwald’s alchemical paintings and sculpture are simultaneously hypnotizing and visceral—integrating the artist’s hand in a manner that is both base and instinctually human. Whether its pouring resin into paper bags or injecting cooked mussels and hair elastics, among other things, the difficulty in digesting these works is intentional. In her attempt to ignore art historical tropes, Eichwald’s work evokes Outsider art and disarms the audience’s desire for narrative. The romanticism of the German painting tradition, grounded by Dieter Roth and Gerhard Richter, also influences her output and links it to a figurative inclination. Linking object and image, Eichwald forces her audience to reconsider the facades of realism and artificiality.”-artspace.com/michaela-eichwald

Continue reading MICHAELA EICHWALD

JULIAN SCHNABEL: FOX FARM PAINTINGS, Pace Gallery, December 1989

27 years ago, in December 1989,  Julian Schnabel showed a new series of paintings at The Pace Gallery which was coined by critic Thomas McEvilley  as “The Fox Farm Paintings”. The paintings took a variety of shapes and forms but all were painted upon a deep, red velvet and incorporated the text: ”There is no place on this planet more horrible than a fox farm during pelting season.”

Below is a republished review of the show by Roberta Smith, for The New York Times:

Continue reading JULIAN SCHNABEL: FOX FARM PAINTINGS, Pace Gallery, December 1989

RICHARD DIEBENKORN:profile/interview, CBS Sunday Morning, December 27, 1988,

In this report for “Sunday Morning,” which originally aired on December 27, 1988, correspondent David Browning visited Diebenkorn’s studio in California’s Sonoma County, to discuss the artist’s “trial and error” approach; and New York’s Museum of Modern Art, where Diebenkorn was being celebrated by a one-man show of his drawings.

Lorser Feitelson, West Coast Hard-Edge Abstraction, Pt4

 

Lorser Feitelson, along with his wife Helen Lundeberg, were pioneers of what was to become known as Hard-Edge abstraction in the late 1940s into the 50’s.  Lorser, along with his peers and fellow artists, Karl BenjaminFrederick Hammersley and John McLaughlin were featured in the landmark exhibition, Four Abstract Classicists at the San Francisco Museum of Art in 1959.  Jules Langsner, critic, psychiatrist and organizer of the exhibition coined the term “hard-edge” in his essay for the exhibition’s catalogue:

“Abstract Classicist painting is hard-edged painting. Forms are finite, flat, rimmed by a hard clean edge. These forms are not intended to evoke in the spectator any recollections of specific shapes he may have encountered in some other connection. They are autonomous shapes, sufficient unto themselves as shapes.” Continue reading Lorser Feitelson, West Coast Hard-Edge Abstraction, Pt4

Frederick Hammersley: West Coast Hard Edge Abstraction, Pt3

Frederick Hammersley was perhaps the most critically acclaimed of the first generation west coast hard-edge painters.  Having been one of the four participants in the landmark Four Abstract Classicists exhibition in 1959, his place within the history of the art movement was firmly established.  The show’s organizer,  Jules Langsner coined the term “hard edge” in his essay for the catalogue: Continue reading Frederick Hammersley: West Coast Hard Edge Abstraction, Pt3

Karl Benjamin: West Coast Hard Edge Abstraction, Pt2

 

Chicago native Karl Benjamin found his way to California to go to college on the G.I.Bill after serving in the Navy during World War II.  With no formal education in art, Benjamin who was an elementary teacher, began working with crayons in the course of developing art lessons for his students’ curriculum. He became enthralled with the way in which colors appeared to change when in juxtaposition with other colors and enrolled in classes at Claremont Graduate School, ultimately earning an M.A. degree in 1960 and developing a serious art practice as a painter who worked rigorously with color.

‘His principal started it all by asking him to add 47 minutes a week of art instruction to the curriculum.“I bought some crayons and paper,” he said. “And the kids drew trucks, trees, mountains. That was boring, so I said, No trucks, no trees. And they said, What should we do? I said the right thing, even though I didn’t have any background in art. I said, Be quiet and concentrate.” – Jori Finkel, Karl Benjamin’s Colorful Resurgence, New York Times, October 7, 2007 Continue reading Karl Benjamin: West Coast Hard Edge Abstraction, Pt2

Helen Lundeberg: West Coast Hard Edge Abstraction, Pt1

West Coast (Los Angeles) painter Helen Lundeberg (1908-1999) turned to abstraction in the 1950’s after having spent the two previous decades working in social realist and post-surrealist styles of imagemaking. Her precise compositions with their restricted palettes hovered between abstraction and figuration, but always remained rooted in reality, referring  to still lifes, landscapes, planetary forms and architecture.

“I was interested both in the pattern and the three-dimensional illusion created by these very flat geometric forms. At first I confined myself to angles and straight lines. Then I got a little tired of that and began getting some curves.” -Helen Lundeberg

Helen Lundeberg’s paintings have been exhibited widely in prominent museums, including the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Brooklyn Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art at Utah State University and the National Museum of American Art in Washington D.C. Her work was most recently included in the J. Paul Getty Museum’s Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture, 1950–1970, and in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art exhibition titled In Wonderland: The Surrealist Adventures of Women Artists in Mexico and the United States.wikipedia