Tag Archives: ART

THIS IS ISA GENZKEN, mini-documentary, MoMA, 2013, 22 minutes

A well-produced mini-documentary about the work of the artist, Isa Gengken, accompanying her career retrospective at MoMA, New York.

CHARLINE VON HEYL

Charline von Heyl (born 1960) is a German artist best known for her abstract painting. She also works with drawing, printmaking, and collage. She lives and works in New York and Marfa, Texas, together with her husband and fellow painter Christopher Wool.

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MAN RAY :: Rayograph (The Kiss), 1922

thekiss

A photogram is a picture made on photographic paper without the aid of a camera. To make this one, Man Ray exposed the paper to light at least three times. Each time a different set of objects acted as a stencil: a pair of hands, a pair of heads kissing (his and his lover, Kiki de Montparnasse), and two darkroom trays, which seem almost to kiss each other with their corner spouts. With each exposure, the paper darkened where it was not masked. Continue reading MAN RAY :: Rayograph (The Kiss), 1922

“EVA HESSE 1965”, lecture & panel discussion, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 3.13.2013, 126 min.

Taking inspiration from the exhibition Eva Hesse 1965, currently on view at Hauser & Wirth, in London, this panel reexamines Hesse’s legacy by focusing on her artistic experimentation during 1965, a pivotal period when she rethought her approach to color, materials, and two-dimensional work, and formed the foundation for her sculptural practice. Elisabeth Sussman, Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art, moderates a conversation among writer William S. Wilson and contributors to the exhibition catalogue Todd Alden, Susan Fisher Sterling, and Kirsten Swenson.

This event took place at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art on March 16, 2013. Video courtesy Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation.

TERRY WINTERS: UNINTENDED THINGS TO HAPPEN, interview, Louisiana Museum, 2015 9 min.

A wonderful, thoughtful short interview with the artist Terry Winters by Anders Kold at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2015. Continue reading TERRY WINTERS: UNINTENDED THINGS TO HAPPEN, interview, Louisiana Museum, 2015 9 min.

KOSHIRO ONCHI, father of the sōsaku-hanga movement

 

“Art is not to be understood by the mind but by the heart. If we go back to its origin, painting is expressed in color and form by the heart, and it should never be limited to a world of reflected forms captured by visual sense. Therefore, expression of the heart through color and forms separated from color and form in the real world is that true realm of painting. I will for the time call this type of work the ‘lyrique’.” -Koshiro Onchi

Kōshirō Onchi , 2 July 1891 – 3 June 1955 was born in Tokyo, was a Japanese print-maker. He was the father of the sōsaku-hanga movement in twentieth century Japan, and a photographer. Continue reading KOSHIRO ONCHI, father of the sōsaku-hanga movement

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL

Kerry James Marshall challenges the marginalization of African-Americans through his formally rigorous paintings, drawings, videos, and installations, whose central protagonists are always, in his words, “unequivocally, emphatically black.” As he describes, his work is rooted in his life experience: “You can’t be born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1955 and grow up in South Central [Los Angeles] near the Black Panthers headquarters, and not feel like you’ve got some kind of social responsibility. You can’t move to Watts in 1963 and not speak about it.” Marshall’s erudite knowledge of art history and black folk art structures his compositions; he mines black culture and stereotypes for his unflinching subject matter. In Black Star (2011), a nude black woman bursts through a Frank Stella-like canvas, commanding attention and daring viewers to consider how she has been (and how she should be) seen and portrayed. – artsy.net

 

American, b. 1955, Birmingham, Alabama, based in Chicago, Illinois

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HAROLD KRISEL, MID-CENTURY HARD-EDGE ABSTRACTION

Harold Krisel was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1920. He studied architecture in Chicago at the New Bauhaus from 1946-1949 on the G.I. Bill after he was discharged from the army where he served from 1942-1945. Just 26 at the time he had been interested in art since studying in New York in the 1930s with Carl Holty and Harry Holtzman. He became a member of American Abstract Artists in 1946, and retained this membership for the duration of his life. In 1942 he married Rose Breuer and the couple had three daughters.Krisel completed his graduate studies at the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1952.

His many influences there helped direct his course of study and his career path. Founder Lazlo-Nagy had just stepped down and the new director, Serge Chermayeff, recognized something special in this new student and committed to his education as an architect. Krises met famed artist Mondrian and developed friendships with Gyorgy Kepes, who founded the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT; Martin Rosenzweig, noted graphic designer; and Harold Cohen the distinguished designer and architect.

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Marcel Duchamp, 1968 BBC interview

BBC’s Joan Bakewell interviewed Marcel Duchamp in June 1968, just months before his death. Bakewell asks the artist about his life and relationship to retinal art and Dada, as well as his thoughts on more contemporary works by Happenings artists such as Allan Kaprow. Duchamp speaks about individualism in face of the group think that occurs in self-defined movements such as Dada.