Videos

MICHEL FOUCAULT: THE LOST INTERVIEW, 16 minutes

Notes on the video:

This until now rarely seen 15-minute footage is of an interview that was conducted by the Dutch philosopher Fons Elders in preparation for the debate between Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucault, which was broadcasted on Dutch television on Sunday, Nov. 28, 1971. The whole interview was essentially lost for decades and was published in the winter of 2012 for the first time. It is now available as a full-length book under the title of “Freedom and Knowledge.” It includes an excellent introduction by author of “Mad for Foucault,” Lynne Huffer, and additional contributions by Fons Elders. Continue reading MICHEL FOUCAULT: THE LOST INTERVIEW, 16 minutes

“EVA HESSE 1965”, lecture & panel discussion, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 3.13.2013, 126 min.

Taking inspiration from the exhibition Eva Hesse 1965, currently on view at Hauser & Wirth, in London, this panel reexamines Hesse’s legacy by focusing on her artistic experimentation during 1965, a pivotal period when she rethought her approach to color, materials, and two-dimensional work, and formed the foundation for her sculptural practice. Elisabeth Sussman, Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art, moderates a conversation among writer William S. Wilson and contributors to the exhibition catalogue Todd Alden, Susan Fisher Sterling, and Kirsten Swenson.

This event took place at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art on March 16, 2013. Video courtesy Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation.

THE YOGIS OF TIBET, documentary, 2003, 76 min.

ANNE WALDMAN & TED BERRIGAN :: “MEMORIAL DAY”, 1973

This reading of Waldman and Berrigan’s poem “Memorial Day” was performed as part of a reading series at 98 Greene Street Loft curated by the poet Ted Greenwald. The video was shot by Sandy Hirsch on the only video format that existed at the time, 1/2 inch open reel video, often referred to as Portapak, and like any video shot in this format from the late 1960s to early 1970s, it is now a very fragile historical document.
1/2 in. video reel : sd., b&w ; Holly Solomon Gallery records, circa 1948-2003. Archives of American Art.

TERRY WINTERS: UNINTENDED THINGS TO HAPPEN, interview, Louisiana Museum, 2015 9 min.

A wonderful, thoughtful short interview with the artist Terry Winters by Anders Kold at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2015. Continue reading TERRY WINTERS: UNINTENDED THINGS TO HAPPEN, interview, Louisiana Museum, 2015 9 min.

GAGAKU: The Court Music Of Japan, documentary, 1989, 60 min.

Gagaku: The Court Music of Japan is an 1989 documentary exploring the history and forms of this hauntingly beautiful ancient Japanese music. Host for the program is Dr. William P. Malm, Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Michigan, who introduces the instruments of gagaku and the musicians who play them. Also featured in the program is Suenobu Togi, Gagaku Master at UCLA and Dr. Sidney Brown, Professor of Asian Studies of the University of Oklahoma, who explains the historic roots of gagaku. Performances by the Imperial Court Orchestra in Tokyo illustrate the contrasting styles of gagaku.

 

 

KAIA KATER

The banjo’s recent return to favour has seen the likes of Otis Taylor and Rhiannon Giddens reclaim the instrument as part of African America’s musical roots. Twenty-three-year-old Kaia Kater from Québec studied mountain music in West Virginia and writes songs from the here and now. Her second album manages to triangulate bluegrass, Nina Simone and Toni Morrison, with numbers provoked by school shootings (Paradise Fell) and Black Lives Matter, next to fiddle-and-banjo folk standards and an opener, Saint Elizabeth, that details a woman being stalked. Recorded in a day, it’s an intense, mostly solo affair, with Kater’s banjo and rich voice supported by bass, muted trumpet and backing vocals.              -Neil Spencer, The Guardian