Tag Archives: Modern Painting

Clyfford Still with PH-1024, photo by Patricia Still, 1976

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Clyfford Still with PH-1024, 1976

Photographed by Patricia Still. © City and County of Denver, courtesy the Clyfford Still Museum Archives.

PER KIRKEBY

Per Kirkeby (born 1 September 1938, in Copenhagen) is a Danish painter, poet, film maker and sculptor.  By the time he completed a masters education in arctic geology at the University of Copenhagen in 1964, he was already part of the important experimental art school “eks-skolen” and worked primarily as a painter, sculptor, writer and a lithographic artist which he has pursued ever since. Influenced by his scientific roots as well as the gestural works of the Abstract Expressionists, Kirkeby creates expressive, heavily layered paintings, which can resemble geological strata, the Danish landscape, and even the female form. Continue reading PER KIRKEBY

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG:: TRAPEZE, 1964

b70db8a42923ad96ac66836e72144a68In the early 1960s, Robert Rauschenberg dedicated himself to a different kind of image-making, one that involved photographic transfer onto canvas. It was the birth of his celebrated series of Silkscreen Paintings which anticipated the post-modernist idea of appropriation, later one of the protagonist techniques of Pop art. What’s interesting is that in 1964, after he won the International Gran Premio for Painting at the Venice Biennale, the artist promptly phoned home to order that all of his remaining silkscreens be destroyed, to end the series.

DAVID SALLE: RECENT WORK , 2016

*A selected group of recent paintings (2016) from David Salle’s website.

JULIAN SCHNABEL: FOX FARM PAINTINGS, Pace Gallery, December 1989

27 years ago, in December 1989,  Julian Schnabel showed a new series of paintings at The Pace Gallery which was coined by critic Thomas McEvilley  as “The Fox Farm Paintings”. The paintings took a variety of shapes and forms but all were painted upon a deep, red velvet and incorporated the text: ”There is no place on this planet more horrible than a fox farm during pelting season.”

Below is a republished review of the show by Roberta Smith, for The New York Times:

Continue reading JULIAN SCHNABEL: FOX FARM PAINTINGS, Pace Gallery, December 1989